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One Tree Park City of London
   

One Tree Park

One Tree Park, Gatepiers to St Botolph's Graveyard, June 2010. Photo: S Williams

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One Tree Park is on the site of the Upper Burying Ground of the parish of St Botolph by Billingsgate, with a plaque to this effect set into the paved courtyard. Old gate and stone piers, possibly dating from the C18th, remain at the corner of Monument Street. The medieval church of St Botolph Billingsgate stood south of Lower Thames Street to the east of the former churchyard; it was rebuilt in the late C16th but later destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 and not rebuilt. Part of the site was used for the widening of Thames Street. The parish was joined to that of St George Botolph Lane, for which the churchyard become an additional burial ground.
   
Previous / Other name: St Botolph's Graveyard; St Botolph Billingsgate
Site location: Monument Street/Botolph Lane
Postcode: EC3R 8BT
Type of site: Private Garden 
Date(s): medieval; C20th
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
Borough: City of London
Site ownership: private
Site management:
Open to public? No
Opening times: private, but visible
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Monument (District, Circle) / Bank (Central, DLR, Northern, Waterloo & City)
Illustration of St George's Botolph Lane, c.1838 reproduced from Godwin, 'The Churches of London' Vol II, 1839
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The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/05/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Fuller information:

This small paved area was once the Upper Burying Ground of the parish of St Botolph by Billingsgate, with a plaque to this effect set into the paved courtyard. The burial ground was established in 1392 and the old gate and stone piers at the corner of Monument Street possibly date from the C18th. St Botolph Billingsgate was destroyed in 1666 in the Great Fire of London and not subsequently rebuilt. It had stood south of Lower Thames Street to the east of the churchyard; first mentioned in C12th, the medieval church had been rebuilt in the late C16th. After the Great Fire part of the site was used for the widening of Thames Street and the parish was joined to that of St George Botolph Lane, a church rebuilt by Wren after the Fire but which was demolished in 1904. St Botolph was the Anglo-Saxon patron saint of travellers, and as a result churches with this dedication were usually located at city gates. Among those buried at St Botolph's was English composer Thomas Morley (1557/8 - 1602), who was a leading member of the English Madrigal School, an organist at St Paul's Cathedral and, along with another composer Robert Johnson, was composer of the only surviving contemporary settings of Shakespeare's verse. In 1873 the OS map shows the former burial ground as a playground for Billingsgate Ward School. It is now a private courtyard to a residential building, with one modern circular planter and minimal planting.

Sources consulted:

Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.).
Grid ref: TQ330806
Size in hectares: 0.0141
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade :
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Lovat Lane
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Strategic Viewing Corridor; Monument Views and Setting
   

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