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St Ann Blackfriars Burial Grounds: Church Entry and Ireland Yard City of London
   

St Ann Blackfriars Burial Grounds: Church Entry and Ireland Yard

St Ann Blackfriars Burial Grounds: Church Entry, June 2010. Photo S Williams

> Enlarge picture
The parish of St Ann Blackfriars was established after the dissolution of the C13th Friary of the Dominicans or Black Friars, so called for the colour of their clothes. The Priory church, initially used as the parish church from 1544, was demolished in 1550 and subsequent complaints by local inhabitants deprived of a place of worship led to the building of St Ann Blackfriars in 1597. It was built on the site known as Ireland Yard, once part of the Provincial's Hall of the Priory. Part of the site of the nave of the Friary church became the burial ground of St Ann, the site now known as Church Entry. St Ann's burnt down in the Great Fire of 1666 and was not rebuilt, the parish amalgamating with that of St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe and the church site became a burial ground. The two churchyards closed in 1849 and were later laid out as public gardens, largely paved, both raised and containing a number of tombstones.
   
Previous / Other name:
Site location: Church Entry and Ireland Yard
Postcode: EC4V 5EX
Type of site: Public Gardens 
Date(s): Ireland Yard 1666; Church Entry 1597
Designer(s):
Listed structures: LBII: fragment of rubble wall in Ireland Yard; St Anne's Vestry Hall at Church Entry
Borough: City of London
Site ownership: Diocese of London
Site management: City of London Corporation Open Spaces Dept
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: weekdays; 8am - 7pm or dusk if earlier
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Blackfriars (District, Circle). Rail: Blackfriars
St Ann Blackfriars Burial Grounds: Church Entry, June 2010. Photo S Williams
> Enlarge
St Ann Blackfriars Burial Grounds: Church Entry, June 2010. Photo S Williams
> Enlarge
> Enlarge
St Ann Blackfriars Burial Grounds: Ireland Yard, June 2010. Photo S Williams
> Enlarge
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/06/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/openspaces

Fuller information:

The parish of St Ann Blackfriars was established after the Dissolution of the Monasteries when the former Friary of the Dominicans or Black Friars was dissolved. The Friary was established here in 1276 when the Lord Mayor and Barons of London granted a piece of land near Baynard's Castle to Robert Kilwarby, Archbishop of Canterbury and a former monk of the Dominican Order. Kilwarby built a large church and accommodation for the Black Friars, so-called due to the colour of their clothes, who had come to England in 1221, settling first in Oxford. Benefactors of the monastery included Edward I and Queen Eleanor and it became an important establishment, with parliaments held here and it was also used as a safe refuge place for royal records. The Friary church contained remains of high ranking individuals including King James of Spain and Sir Thomas Parr, father of Katherine Parr, and also the heart of Queen Eleanor, but these were destroyed in 1538 and the land and buildings were sold by the Crown in 1550 to Sir Thomas Cawarden. A new parish was established by 1544 until 1550 when the Priory church was demolished at the Reformation. The complaints of the local inhabitants, deprived of a place of worship, led Sir Thomas to establish St Ann Blackfriars Church, which was consecrated on 11 December 1597. It was built on the site that is now Ireland Yard, which had been part of the Provincial's Hall of the Priory and remains of the old Priory wall is still in the churchyard. However, in the same year the roof of the new church collapsed and the church was enlarged when it was rebuilt in 1598 and again in 1613. Part of the site of the nave of the Friary church later became the burial ground of St Ann. According to a plaque on the site, the name Church Entry 'indicates the usual passage between the nave and chancel passing north and south beneath the steeple'. The church burnt down in the Great Fire of 1666 and was not rebuilt, the parish amalgamating with that of St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe (q.v.). The site of St Ann's church was used thereafter as a burial ground.

The two churchyards closed in 1849 and since 1964 have been maintained by Corporation of London. Both gardens are raised above ground level; the Church Entry site has a brick wall with railings above and a gateway with steps leading to the garden with two plane trees, shrubs and seats and some paving, and a few gravestones along the boundary wall with Church Entry. Ireland Yard is an entirely paved area surrounded on three sides by buildings, with a number of gravestones along two sides, a few trees and seats and with remnants of rubble wall next to the entrance.

Sources consulted:

Ben Weinreb & Christopher Hibbert, 'The London Encyclopaedia' (Macmillan, revised ed. 1993); Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.); George Godwin & John Britton 'The Churches of London: A history and description of the Ecclesiastical Edifices of the Metropolis, Volume II', London, 1839; London Diocesan Advisory Committee for the Care of Churches data
Grid ref: TQ317810
Size in hectares: 0.0467 (2 sites)
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade :
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Ludgate Hill
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: Yes - St Paul's Heights Policy Area
Other LA designation: Strategic View - Consultation Area
   

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