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Queen's Wood Haringey
   

Queen's Wood

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A remnant of the Great Forest of Middlesex, this was once called Churchyard Bottom Wood and was reputedly the site of a plague pit. Following a 2-year campaign, it was purchased in 1898 by Hornsey Local Board from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners who were about to sell it for development. Renamed Queen's Wood in commemoration of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897, funds were then raised for drainage, fencing and other works such as a Keeper's Lodge. The wood was opened 'for the free use of the public for ever' on 23 July 1898. A large pond in the centre of the wood was replaced by a concrete paddling pool and refreshment pavilion in 1935, now disused. The Keeper's Lodge was restored in 1998 and used as a Café.
   
Previous / Other name: Churchyard Bottom Wood
Site location: Muswell Hill Road/Queen's Wood Road/Connaught Gardens
Postcode: N10/N6
Type of site: Public Park 
Date(s): ancient woodland; 1898; 1930s
Designer(s):
Listed structures: Keeper's Lodge unsuccessful candidate for listing by EH in 1993/4, but is locally listed
Borough: Haringey
Site ownership: LB Haringey
Site management: Parks Service / Friends of Queen's Wood.
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted. Café open 10-5 daily
Special conditions:
Facilities: Children's play area; Lodge Café, Queen's Wood Lodge Organic Garden, plant sales, workshops
Events: occasional exhibitions in Lodge Café
Public transport: Tube: Highgate (Northern). Bus: 43, 134.
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/01/2012
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.haringey.gov.uk; www.fqw.org.uk

Fuller information:

Queen's Wood is a roughly square site on the east side of Muswell Hill Road with steeply undulating terrain covered with natural woodland. A remnant of the Great Forest of Middlesex, it was formerly known as Churchyard Bottom Wood and reputedly the site of a plague pit. Following a two year fund-raising campaign, it was purchased in 1898 for £25,000 by Hornsey Local Board from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners who were about to sell it for building development. It was renamed Queen's Wood in commemoration of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897. An additional £5,000 was raised to cover drainage, fencing and other works and to build a Keeper's Lodge. £6,000 of the total £30,000 was raised from private donations. It was enclosed in 1898 and opened 'for the free use of the public for ever' on 23 July 1898.

Today it is an attractive area of open woodland, predominantly oak and hornbeam, with a shrub understorey in parts. The trees are of mixed ages, although few appear to be over 150 years. There is evidence of previous hornbeam coppicing, which is documented back to the C16th. The wood is partly enclosed by C19th railings. The Keeper's Lodge (1898/99) is in English Domestic Revival style with picturesque steep roofs, gables, ornamental timber framing, octagonal clock tower and open veranda, was probably designed by Hornsey UDC's then borough engineer J. Lovegrove. It became derelict in the C20th but was restored in 1998 and is now the park café, behind which is an organic garden on the original garden of the Lodge Keeper, now maintained by volunteers. The large pond in the centre of the wood was replaced by a concrete paddling pool and refreshment pavilion in 1935, both of which later fell into disuse. The Friends of Queen's Wood was established to look after the wood, and undertakes regular maintenance and conservation of the landscape. The old disused paddling pool has now been replaced with a large Frogpool to attract a wider range of species and increase diversity. This work was completed in 2011. Through the wood are meandering paths and there are occasional Victorian cast iron marker posts. It is now designated and managed as a nature reserve.

Sources consulted:

Richardson 1983 p 204; Schwitzer and Gay 1995 pp 11-12; Victoria County History; Andrew Crowe, 'The Parks and Woodlands of London' (Fourth Estate, 1987) pp157-9; Ham & High, Jan 7 1994; Hornsey UDC Review of 1896-1900; English Heritage Primary Research File HAR 54. History on Friends of Queen's Wood website: www.fqw.org.uk
Grid ref: TQ287886
Size in hectares: 21.1
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade :
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List: Yes
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: Yes - Metropolitan Importance
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: Yes
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Local Nature Reserve; part of Better Haringey Walking Trail
   

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