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Cranham Marsh Havering
   

Cranham Marsh

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Now a nature reserve managed by Essex Wildlife Trust, Cranham Marsh is all that remains of a much larger area of marshland in Essex. The site today has woodland, ponds, marshland and old pastures, with remains of old hedgerows. A river, a tributary of the Mardyke in Thurrock, runs through Cranham Marsh. Some of the largest ash trees in Essex are found in Spring Wood, and to the east is a smaller woodland with oak and ash, Middle Wood. Parts of the woods are coppiced on a 12-year cycle.
   
Previous / Other name:
Site location: off Ockendon Road/Meadowside Road/Park Drive/Argyle Gardens/The Chase, Cranham
Postcode: RM14
Type of site: Public Open Land 
Date(s):
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
Borough: Havering
Site ownership: LB Havering leased to Essex Wildlife Trust
Site management: LB Havering Countryside Management Service/Essex Wildlife Trust
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Upminster (District) then bus. Bus: 248
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/07/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.essexwt.org.uk

Fuller information:

Now a nature reserve managed by Essex Wildlife Trust, Cranham Marsh is all that remains of a much larger area of marshland in Essex. It contains a variety of habitats including marsh, sedge fen that is one of the best surviving in Essex and ancient woodland. The area east of Upminster is part of Thames Chase. The site today has woodland, ponds, marshland and old pastures, with remains of old hedgerows. A river, a tributary of the Mardyke in Thurrock, runs through Cranham Marsh, and through Corbets Tey. Some of the largest ash trees in Essex are found in Spring Wood, and to the east is a smaller woodland with oak and ash, Middle Wood. Spring Wood is marked on OS (date?) as 'The Preserves' with a footpath nearby running to All Saints Church and Cranham Hall (q.q.v.). South Marsh used to be used for cattle grazing, since cut for hay, and has four drainage ditches bisecting it that are over 100 years old, formerly used to enclose grazing animals ('wet fences') and as beds for watercress beds, grown commercially here. Parts of the woods are coppiced on a 12-year cycle.

Sources consulted:

The Paul Drury Partnership for LB Havering, Cranham Conservation Area and Management Proposals (February 2007); Cranham Marsh leaflet, LB Havering
Grid ref: TQ567856
Size in hectares: 13
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade :
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List: Yes
In Conservation Area: Yes
Conservation Area name: Cranham
Tree Preservation Order: Not known
Nature Conservation Area: Yes - Metropolitan Importance / SSSI
Green Belt:
Metropolitan Open Land:
Special Policy Area: Local Nature Reserve
Other LA designation:
   

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