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King George's Field Southwark
   

King George's Field

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King George's Field is a small park that was created when Bermondsey Borough Council received a grant of 500 from the King George's Fields Foundation in order to procure the small site for public recreation. It is on the site of the church and churchyard of All Saints, which was bombed during WWII. The church had been built in 1840 on land donated by the Lord of the Manor; its churchyard opened in 1843, the last recorded burial in 1888.
   
Previous / Other name: All Saints' Churchyard
Site location: Lower Road/Surrey Quays Road, Rotherhithe
Postcode: SE16
Type of site: Public Gardens 
Date(s): 1843; 1950s/60s
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
Borough: Southwark
Site ownership: LB Southwark
Site management: Parks. Friends of Bermondsey and Rotherhithe Parks
Open to public? Yes
Opening times: 7.30am - sunset
Special conditions:
Facilities: playground, tennis courts
Events:
Public transport: Tube: Canada Water (Jubilee). Bus: 47, 188, P13
The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/07/2002
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.southwark.gov.uk/parks

Fuller information:

King George's Field is a small post-WWII park surrounded by a perimeter wall on two sides and has grass, rose beds and scattered trees. Bermondsey Borough Council received a grant of 500 from the King George's Fields Foundation in order to procure the small 0.75 acre site. The Foundation was set up as a memorial following the King's death in 1936, and provided funding for the creation or improvement of a great many playing fields before it was dissolved in 1965. King George's Field is on the site of the church and churchyard of All Saints, which was bombed during WWII, after which the parish was joined with that of St Mary Rotherhithe (q.v.). All Saints' Church was built in 1840 and designed by Sampson Kempthorne on land donated by the Lord of the Manor, Sir William Maynard Gomm, after whom nearby Gomm Road is named. The churchyard opened in 1843 and was in use until 1857 although the last recorded burial took place in 1888.

Sources consulted:

Ron Woollacott, 'Southwark's Burying Places, Past and Present', Magdala Terrace Nunhead Local History publication, 2001; Mary Boast 'The Story of Rotherhithe', 1980; 'History of the King George's Fields Foundation' and other information on www.fieldsintrust.org
Grid ref: TQ352793
Size in hectares: 0.653
   
On EH National Register : No
EH grade :
Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
Registered common or village green
on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares
Preservation Act 1931:
No
 
The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.
On Local List:
In Conservation Area: No
Conservation Area name:
Tree Preservation Order: No
Nature Conservation Area: No
Green Belt: No
Metropolitan Open Land: No
Special Policy Area: No
Other LA designation: Local Park, Tier Two. Regeneration Area. Strategic Views Protected Viewing Corridor
   

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