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SITE DETAILS

St Margaret's Square Lewisham

Summary

St Margaret's Square is a rectangular slightly sunken garden in front of Nos. 34-50 Adelaide Avenue. The houses were built by the 1890s, and the garden is shown on the Town Plan of 1895 with a row of trees to the main road, and a central flight of steps leading down to the garden on each of the other 3 sides, overlooked by houses. In 1928 the garden is listed as a public garden owned and maintained by the City Corporation, described as 'a rectangular area flanked on one side by Adelaide Road and on the other three sides by a private roadway to residential buildings. Enclosed on the public road side by a low wall with iron railings on top. Very attractively laid out with well-kept lawns and trees.'

Basic Details

Site location:
34-50 Adelaide Avenue

Postcode:
SE4

Type of site:
Public Gardens

Date(s):
1890s

Designer(s):

Listed structures:
None

Borough:
Lewisham

Site ownership:
LB Lewisham

Site management:
Greenscene Department, Glendale Grounds Management

Open to public?
Yes

Opening times:
unrestricted

Special conditions:

Facilities:

Events:

Public transport:
Rail: Crofton Park. Bus: 174, P4.

Citymapper
Citymapper

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/04/2012
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.lewisham.gov.uk

Further Information

Grid ref:
TQ368751

Size in hectares:
0.129

Green Flag:
No

On EH National Register :
No

EH grade:
None

Site on EH Heritage at Risk list:
No

Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No

Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
Yes

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No

In Conservation Area:
Yes

Conservation Area name:
Brockley

Tree Preservation Order:
Not known

Nature Conservation Area:
No

Green Belt:
No

Metropolitan Open Land:
No

Special Policy Area:

Other LA designation:
None

Fuller information

Brockley was developed speculatively between the 1830s and early 1900s, with the majority of houses built in the 1870s and '80s. Prior to this the area had been largely farmland, although in the C12th there was for some 100 years a monastery established in Brockley. A watercourse used to flow through the area to the Ravensbourne at Deptford, famous for its Royal Dockyard, and in the early C19th the Croydon Canal was constructed from the Grand Surrey Canal at Deptford, running through New Cross, Brockley and Forest Hill to Croydon, a major feat of engineering albeit somewhat short-lived. In the 1840s the London to Brighton Railway Company purchased the land and the canal became the route of the railway. The construction of the North Kent Railway in 1849 with a station at St John's was the main spur to development of Brockley's pastures and market gardens south of what is now Lewisham Way. The Deptford tithe map shows Brockley landlords as William Wickham Drake and Anne Tyrwhitt Drake, who leased their land to speculative builders and whose names remain in local streets. The houses show the variety of architectural styles popular in the mid to late Victorian period, with Italianate stucco and Gothic terracotta detailing. Many are set in wide, tree-lined roads with large front and back gardens and some had mews to the rear, adding to the area’s character.

Sources consulted:

Brockley Conservation Area Character Appraisal, LB Lewisham, 2005; Report of the Royal Commission on London Squares, 1928

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